Health & Medical Self-Improvement

Do What You Say You Will Do

Maybe it is the caliber of my friends and acquaintances, but is doing what you say you will do too much to ask in this society? I believe this is not difficult and I and would like to see more action and less talk in 2010.
I know people who make commitments in business, with their children, in their church and in their social clubs, but do NOT follow through.
I feel sick to my stomach if I make a commitment that cannot be kept.
I do not like to reschedule appointments if I can avoid it, and I will not volunteer to help you unless I mean it! Well the road to you-know-where is indeed paved with good intentions.
I am tired of people not doing what they say they will.
Salesmen who do not return on Tuesday to answer your questions, husbands who appear to refuse to paint the mailbox without being prodded and our kids who are not always in the house by dark.
This year I will be making a firm effort in myself, and in those I have influence over, to bring integrity back to commitments.
Here are a few ideals we will be practicing in our home this year: Do not make a promise you cannot keep - if you know up front that you will not, cannot or do not want to commit to something, simply do not say YES! If you make a commitment, keep it - do everything in your power to keep your word.
I was very proud of our 14 year old during the holidays.
She agreed to play an elf and be Santa's helper on all Saturdays in December.
Even though her friends kept calling with much more exciting activities on tap for a Saturday afternoon, she still suited up and helped Santa with the children.
Respect yourself and your promises - by following your words with actions, you will earn a well deserved respect from not just others, but more importantly - yourself! I met a respected business woman recently in our community for lunch.
We enjoyed this time and discovered we had plenty in common.
She has since suggested a couple of coffee meetings, business meetings and conference calls, all of which were rescheduled at her request.
I spent time and energy preparing for these meetings; neither of which were items of her consideration when she rescheduled.
I felt disrespected until I learned from others that she does seem to have a problem following through on her ideas and appointments.
People tend to commit to too many different tasks.
Learning to say "no" in the first place is better than saying "yes" and not following through.
Quickly enough you will develop a reputation for not being reliable, or even worse, scatterbrained.
As it turns out, this respected business woman is known to be wishy-washy, and she frequently changes her mind...
so my question is: Why then, is she considered a respected professional and so well liked? Apparently your neighborhood and perceived income level will gain you favor, forgiving you of social inconsideration.
Sorry, that is not my style and professionally, I am not impressed.
Laurence Haughton wrote, It's Not What You Say...
It's What You Do: How Following Through At Every Level Can Make or Break Your Company.
The title alone describes what is crucial.
At every level of your life, you must do what you say you will do when you make a commitment.
"Words are cheap", we all know that, but we also know that "actions speak louder than words".

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